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Med Phys. 2007 Sep;34(9):3428-35.

Femoropopliteal artery centerline interpolation using contralateral shape.

Author information

1
School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5105, USA.

Abstract

Curved planar reformation allows comprehensive visualization of arterial flow channels, providing information about calcified and noncalcified plaques and degrees of stenoses. Existing semiautomated centerline-extraction algorithms for curved planar reformation generation fail in severely diseased and occluded arteries. We explored whether contralateral shape information could be used to reconstruct centerlines through femoropopliteal occlusions. We obtained CT angiography data sets of 29 subjects (16m/13f, 19-86yo) without peripheral arterial occlusive disease and five consecutive subjects (1m/4f, 54-85yo) with unilateral femoropopliteal arterial occlusions. A gradient-based method was used to extract the femoropopliteal centerlines in nondiseased segments. Centerlines of the five occluded segments were manually determined by four experts, two times each. We interpolated missing centerlines in 2475 simulated occlusions of various occlusion lengths in nondiseased subjects. We used different curve registration methods (reflection, similarity, affine, and global polynomial) to align the nonoccluded segments, matched the end points of the occluded segments to the corresponding patent end points, and recorded maximum Euclidean distances to the known centerlines. We also compared our algorithm to an existing knowledge-based PCA interpolation algorithm using the nondiseased subjects. In the five subjects with real femoropopliteal occlusions, we measured the maximum Euclidean distance and the percentage of the interpolation that remained within a typical 3 mm radius vessel. In the nondiseased subjects, we found that the rigid registration methods were not significantly (p<0.750) different among themselves but were more accurate than the nonrigid methods (p<0.001). In simulations using nondiseased subjects, our method produced centerlines that stayed within 3 mm of a semiautomatically tracked centerline in occlusions up to 100 mm in length; however, the PCA method was significantly more accurate for all occlusions lengths. In the actual clinical cases, we found the following [occlusion length (mm):error (mm)]: 16.5:0.775, 42.0:1.54, 79.9:1.82, 145:3.23, and 292:6.13, which were almost always more accurate than the PCA algorithm. We conclude that the use of contralateral shape information, when available, is a promising method for the interpolation of centerlines through arterial occlusions.

PMID:
17926944
DOI:
10.1118/1.2759603
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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