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Intensive Care Med. 2008 Feb;34(2):350-4. Epub 2007 Oct 10.

Short-term beneficial effects of methylene blue on kidney damage in septic shock patients.

Author information

1
Radboud University, Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Nijmegen Center for Molecular Life Sciences, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We previously demonstrated that upregulation of renal inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is associated with proximal tubule injury during systemic inflammation in humans. In this study we investigated the short-term effect of methylene blue (MB), an inhibitor of the NO pathway, on kidney damage and function in septic shock patients.

DESIGN AND SETTING:

A prospective clinical study conducted in an intensive care unit.

PATIENTS:

Nine patients (four men, five women, mean age 71 +/- 3 years) with confirmed or suspected bacterial infection and with refractory septic shock defined as a mean arterial pressure < or = 70 mmHg despite norepinephrine infusion > or = 0.2 microg/kg per minute.

INTERVENTIONS:

A 4 h continuous intravenous infusion of 1 mg/kg MB per hour.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

The urinary excretion of NO metabolites decreased with median 90% (range 75-95%) from baseline to 6 h after MB administration. The first 24 h creatinine clearance improved by 51% (18-173%) after MB treatment but was still strongly impaired. During the first 6 h after the start of MB treatment both the urinary excretion of cytosolic glutathione S-transferase A1-1 and P1-1, markers for proximal and distal tubule damage, respectively, decreased by 45% (10-70%) and 70% (40-85) vs. baseline. After termination of the MB infusion the NO metabolites and markers of tubular injury returned to pretreatment levels.

CONCLUSIONS:

In septic patients with refractory shock short-term infusion of MB is associated with a decrease in NO production and an attenuation of the urinary excretion of renal tubular injury markers.

PMID:
17926021
PMCID:
PMC2228379
DOI:
10.1007/s00134-007-0867-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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