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Diabetes Obes Metab. 2007 Nov;9(6):813-39.

Oxidative stress and potential interventions to reduce oxidative stress in overweight and obesity.

Author information

1
The Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. hvincent@adelphia.net

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Obesity may be a state of chronic oxidative stress. Oxidative stress may be the mechanism underlying the development of co-morbidities in obesity. This review provides a summary of the available evidence regarding systemic oxidative stress in young, older and clinical obese populations.

METHODS:

Medline was searched for all available articles published between 1975 and 2006 that evaluated oxidative stress biomarkers in resting conditions or following various interventions in overweight and obese humans.

RESULTS:

Obesity elevates oxidative stress in young, old and clinical populations as shown by elevations in lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde, hydroperoxides, 4-hydroxynonenal, isoprostanes, conjugated dienes) or protein oxidation (8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine). Lipid peroxidation is associated with several indices of adiposity and a low systemic antioxidant defence (i.e. antioxidant enzymes, tissue dietary antioxidants, glutathione). Oxidative stress may be exacerbated with acute exercise, advancing age or co-existing clinical conditions and may be corrected by improving antioxidant defences through fat volume reduction via surgery, pharmacological agents, exercise and/or dietary modification.

CONCLUSION:

Oxidative stress is related to chronic disease in obesity, but is reversible with one or more interventions described above.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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