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Biochemistry. 2007 Oct 30;46(43):12355-65. Epub 2007 Oct 9.

IIAGlc inhibition of glycerol kinase: a communications network tunes protein motions at the allosteric site.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics and Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843-2128, USA.

Abstract

Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy methods applied to an extrinsic fluorophore that is conjugated to non-native cysteine residues demonstrate that amino acids in an allosteric communication network within a protein subunit tune protein backbone motions at a distal site to enable allosteric binding and inhibition. The unphosphorylated form of the phosphocarrier protein IIAGlc is an allosteric inhibitor of Escherichia coli glycerol kinase, binding more than 25 A from the kinase active site. Crystal structures that showed a ligand-dependent conformational change and large temperature factors for the IIAGlc-binding site on E. coli glycerol kinase suggest that motions of the allosteric site have an important role in the inhibition. Three E. coli glycerol kinase amino acids that are located at least 15 A from the active site and the allosteric site were shown previously to be necessary for transplanting IIAGlc inhibition into the nonallosteric glycerol kinase from Haemophilus influenzae. These three amino acids are termed the coupling locus. The apparent allosteric site motions and the requirement for the distant coupling locus to transplant allosteric inhibition suggest that the coupling locus modulates the motions of the IIAGlc-binding site. To evaluate this possibility, variants of E. coli glycerol kinase and the chimeric, allosteric H. influenzae glycerol kinase were constructed with a non-native cysteine residue replacing one of the native residues in the IIAGlc-binding site. The extrinsic fluorophore Oregon Green 488 (2',7'-difluorofluorescein) was conjugated specifically to the non-native cysteine residue. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements show that the motions of the fluorophore reflect backbone motions of the IIAGlc-binding site and these motions are modulated by the amino acids at the coupling locus.

PMID:
17924663
DOI:
10.1021/bi7010948
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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