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Med Teach. 2007 Sep;29(6):606-10.

Mission Statement Day: the impact on medical students of an early exercise in professionalism.

Author information

1
Dept of Paediatrics, University of Western Ontario, Canada. ckenyon@uwo.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The development of professional attitudes in medical students is an important aspect of medical education.

AIMS:

This qualitative study describes medical students' experience of Mission Statement Day.

METHOD:

The study was conducted using focus groups and key informant interviews. Thematic analysis identified key words, phrases, and concepts. The data was condensed into major themes and key quotes were identified to illustrate each theme.

RESULTS:

The process of creating a Mission Statement was more important than the Mission Statement. Three themes were identified; the central role of patients, bonding and group formation, and student ownership and valuing of the Mission Statement. Patient involvement was critical to exploring the disease and illness experience, and to stimulating discussion about compassion and professional relationships. Role modelling by faculty highlighted the value placed on this experience by the medical school. The experience was memorable, prompting the medical students to reflect on their personal values and their decision to enter medical school.

CONCLUSIONS:

Creation of a Mission Statement is a powerful way to introduce students to their future professional role, identify their values, and begin to develop a sense of professional identity. This memorable experience could be expanded to help students continue their professional growth.

PMID:
17922359
DOI:
10.1080/01421590701602079
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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