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J Am Coll Nutr. 2007 Aug;26(4):350-5.

The influence of calcium consumption on weight and fat following 9 months of exercise in men and women.

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1
Department of Exercise and Health Sciences, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Boston, 100 Morrissey Boulevard Boston, MA 02125-3393, USA. bruce.baily@umb.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is some evidence that calcium consumption improves weight loss during energy restriction but the effects of calcium consumption in conjunction with chronic exercise are unknown.

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of the study was to determine the degree to which calcium consumption influences weight and fat weight change as a result of 9 months of verified supervised exercise in the absence of energy restriction.

METHODS:

Participants were 50 previously sedentary, overweight and moderately obese men (n=20) and women (n=30). Exercise of moderate intensity was performed for 45 min/d, 5 d/wk, under supervision. Diet intake was ad libitum and was measured for energy, macronutrient and micronutrient composition at baseline, 4 and 9 months by use of observer recorded weighed plate waste and multiple-pass 24-h dietary recall procedures.

RESULTS:

Average calcium consumption was 987 +/- 389 mg/day for men and 786 +/- 276 mg/day for women. Weight change over the 9 months was -4.6 +/- 4.6 kg for men and 0.2 +/- 3.3 kg for women. Calcium consumption was associated with weight change (r =-0.47, p<0.05) in men. The calcium to protein ratio was associated with weight change (r=0.56) and fat weight change (r=-0.53) in men. There was no observed association between calcium and weight or fat weight change in women.

CONCLUSION:

Weight and fat weight loss as a result of nine months of moderate intensity exercise may be improved by increased calcium consumption in men but was not observed in women.

PMID:
17906187
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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