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Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007 Dec 1;176(11):1072-8. Epub 2007 Sep 27.

Secreted phospholipase A2 group X overexpression in asthma and bronchial hyperresponsiveness.

Author information

1
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Box 356522, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. tealh@u.washington.edu

Abstract

RATIONALE:

Secreted phospholipase A(2) enzymes (sPLA(2)s) play key regulatory roles in the biosynthesis of eicosanoids, such as the cysteinyl leukotrienes, but the role of these enzymes in the pathogenesis of asthma is not known.

OBJECTIVES:

To establish if sPLA(2)s are overexpressed in the airways of patients with asthma, and to determine if these enzymes may play a role in the generation of eicosanoids in exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

METHODS:

Induced sputum samples were obtained from subjects with asthma with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and nonasthmatic control subjects at baseline, and on a separate day 30 minutes after exercise challenge. The expression of the PLA(2)s in induced sputum cells and supernatant was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

The sPLA(2)s expressed at the highest levels in airway cells of subjects with asthma were groups X and XIIA. Group X sPLA(2) (sPLA(2)-X) was differentially overexpressed in asthma and localized to airway epithelial cells and bronchial macrophages. The gene expression, immunostaining in airway epithelial cells and bronchial macrophages, and the level of the extracellular sPLA(2)-X protein in the airways increased in response to exercise challenge in the asthma group, whereas the levels were lower and unchanged after challenge in nonasthmatic control subjects.

CONCLUSIONS:

Increased expression of sPLA(2)-X may play a key role in the dysregulated eicosanoid synthesis in asthma.

PMID:
17901411
PMCID:
PMC2176098
DOI:
10.1164/rccm.200707-1088OC
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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