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J Pers Soc Psychol. 2007 Oct;93(4):600-13.

Who goes to the bargaining table? The influence of gender and framing on the initiation of negotiation.

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1
Department of Marketing, Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, PA 19104-6340, USA. deborahs@wharton.upenn.edu

Abstract

Unlike typical negotiation experiments, these studies investigated when men and women initiate negotiations in the absence of overt prescriptions to negotiate. Using a new experimental paradigm, the authors showed that the framing of situations is a critical driver of gender differences in initiating negotiations. Drawing on literature on language, power, and politeness, the authors argued that framing situations as opportunities for negotiation is particularly intimidating to women, as this language is inconsistent with norms for politeness among low-power individuals, such as women. By contrast, framing situations as opportunities for asking is much less intimidating to women, as this language is more polite and role-consistent. Consequently, gender differences in initiating negotiations persisted when situations were framed as opportunities for negotiation yet were eliminated when situations were framed as opportunities to ask. Moreover, primed power attenuated gender differences in aversive reactions to the negotiation frame. In all, the studies presented begin to elucidate the reasons for gender differences in initiating negotiations and further illustrate that such effects depend on the situation.

PMID:
17892334
DOI:
10.1037/0022-3514.93.4.600
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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