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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Sep;15(9):2328-35.

Media use and obesity in adolescent females.

Author information

1
University of California-Irvine, Irvine, California, USA. mjamner@uci.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

In the context of growing public health concern with the obesity rates among children and adolescents, much attention has focused on the role of television as a contributor to the problem. Less attention has been devoted to interactive media (internet surfing and video games), despite the fact that these forms of entertainment are fast gaining in popularity among youth. This study investigated the relative associations of TV viewing and interactive media use with body fat and BMI, controlling for both physical activity participation and cardiovascular fitness.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES:

Female high-school adolescents (N = 194) were assessed for cardiovascular fitness (cycle ergometer), percent body fat (DXA), and BMI. Time spent in moderate, vigorous, and sedentary activities was assessed with a 3-day recall.

RESULTS:

Multivariate regression analysis showed that only interactive media use was associated with percentage body fat and BMI, and the relationship remained strong even after controlling for physical activity participation and cardiovascular fitness.

DISCUSSION:

It appears that, among this group of adolescent females, the association between interactive media use and obesity is not explained by a reduction in moderate or vigorous activity commensurate with media use.

PMID:
17890502
DOI:
10.1038/oby.2007.276
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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