Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2007 Dec;13(12):1467-74.

Early bacterial dependent induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in epithelial cells upon transfer of CD45RB(high) CD4(+) T cells in a model for experimental colitis.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Both the role of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) as well as the molecular details governing its mucosal induction remain unclear.

METHODS:

In the present study we evaluated the role of the residing intestinal microflora in the induction of epithelial iNOS upon transfer of CD45RB(high) CD4(+) T cells to SCID mice. CB-17 SCID mice were reared with conventional flora (CNV) or germfree CB-17 SCID mice were monoassociated with Helicobacter muridarum, act A(-) mutant Listeria monocytogenes, segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB), or Ochrobactrum anthropi.

RESULTS:

Within 2 weeks CNV SCID mice injected with CD45RB(high) CD4(+) T cells showed a focal, epithelial iNOS expression on the apical site of villi that preceded the infiltration of CD4(+) T cells and cytokine production followed by extension of this expression to the entire surface along the whole crypt axis as the colitis progressed. SCID mice monoassociated with H. muridarum developed a severe colitis and showed high epithelial iNOS expression. CNV-SCID mice without T cells and SCID mice monoassociated with SFB did not show any iNOS expression, whereas SCID mice monoassociated with act A(-) mutant L. monocytogenes and O. anthropi showed some scattered epithelial iNOS staining on the apical site of a few villi, but none of these mice developed colitis.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings demonstrate that the expression of epithelial iNOS is highly bacterium-specific and correlates with the severity of disease, suggesting an important role for this enzyme in the development of IBD.

PMID:
17879278
DOI:
10.1002/ibd.20262
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wolters Kluwer
    Loading ...
    Support Center