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Oncol Nurs Forum. 2007 Sep;34(5):E51-9.

Randomized trial of a cognitive-behavioral intervention for insomnia in breast cancer survivors.

Author information

1
Carl T. Hayden Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Clinics in Phoenix, AZ, USA. dana.epstein@va.gov

Abstract

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES:

To determine the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral intervention for treating insomnia in breast cancer survivors.

DESIGN:

Randomized controlled trial.

SETTING:

University and medical center settings.

SAMPLE:

72 women at least three months after primary treatment for breast cancer with sleep-onset or sleep maintenance insomnia at least three nights per week for at least three months as determined through daily sleep diaries.

METHODS:

Random assignment to a multicomponent intervention (stimulus control instructions, sleep restriction, and sleep education and hygiene) or a single-component control group (sleep education and hygiene).

MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES:

Sleep-onset latency, wake after sleep onset, total sleep time, time in bed, sleep efficiency, and sleep quality.

FINDINGS:

After the intervention, both groups improved on sleep-onset latency, wake after sleep onset, total sleep time, time in bed, sleep efficiency, and sleep quality based on daily sleep diaries. A between-group difference existed for time in bed. Wrist actigraph data showed significant pre- to postintervention changes for sleep-onset latency, wake after sleep onset, total sleep time, and time in bed. When compared to the control group, the multicomponent intervention group rated overall sleep as more improved.

CONCLUSIONS:

A nonpharmacologic intervention is effective in the treatment of insomnia in breast cancer survivors.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING:

Breast cancer survivors can benefit from a cognitive-behavioral intervention for chronic insomnia. Sleep education and hygiene, a less complex treatment than a multicomponent intervention, also is effective in treating insomnia.

PMID:
17878117
DOI:
10.1188/07.ONF.E51-E59
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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