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Arch Surg. 2007 Sep;142(9):840-6; discussion 844-6.

Use of admission serum lactate and sodium levels to predict mortality in necrotizing soft-tissue infections.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute, CA, USA.

Abstract

HYPOTHESIS:

Simple admission laboratory values can be used to classify patients with necrotizing soft-tissue infection (NSTI) into high and low mortality risk groups.

DESIGN:

Chart review.

SETTING:

Public teaching hospital.

PATIENTS:

All patients with NSTI from 1997 through 2006.

INTERVENTIONS:

Variables analyzed included medical history, admission vital signs, laboratory values, and microbiologic findings. Data analyses included univariate and classification and regression tree analyses.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Mortality.

RESULTS:

One hundred twenty-four patients were identified with NSTI. The overall mortality rate was 21 of 124 (17%). On univariate analysis, factors associated with mortality included a history of cancer (P = .03), intravenous drug abuse (P < .001), low systolic blood pressure on admission (P = .03), base deficit (P = .009), and elevated white blood cell count (P = .06). On exploratory classification and regression tree analysis, admission serum lactate and sodium levels were predictors of mortality, with a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 28%, positive predictive value of 23%, and negative predictive value of 100%. A serum lactate level greater than or equal to 54.1 mg/dL (6 mmol/L) alone was associated with a 32% mortality, whereas a serum sodium level greater than or equal to 135 mEq/L combined with a lactate level less than 54.1 mg/dL was associated with a mortality of 0%.

CONCLUSIONS:

Mortality for NSTIs remains high. A simple model, using admission serum lactate and serum sodium levels, may help identify patients at greatest risk for death.

PMID:
17875838
DOI:
10.1001/archsurg.142.9.840
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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