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Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2007;67(6):612-8.

Temporal changes of the plasma levels of cystatin C, beta-trace protein, beta2-microglobulin, urate and creatinine during pregnancy indicate continuous alterations in the renal filtration process.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. karl.kristensen@med.lu.se

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the plasma levels of the renal functional markers creatinine, urate, cystatin C, beta2-microglobulin and beta-trace protein in samples from the first, second, early third and late third trimesters of 398 healthy women with uncomplicated singleton pregnancies.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

Plasma samples from 58 healthy non-pregnant women served as controls. The creatinine levels were significantly lower at all time-points in pregnancy, whereas the urate levels were lower during the first and second trimesters but increased in the late third trimester. The cystatin C, beta2-microglobulin and beta-trace protein levels displayed similar changes with increased levels in the third trimester but unaltered levels during the first and second trimesters.

RESULTS:

The results indicate an increased filtration of low-molecular weight molecules during pregnancy, particularly during the first and second trimesters, whereas filtration of 10-30 kDa molecules is decreased in the third but unaltered in the first and second trimesters. The levels of albumin and alph2-macroglobulin were measured in the same samples.

CONCLUSIONS:

The albumin levels decreased in the second and third trimesters, whereas the levels of chi2-macroglobulin were unchanged, which is compatible with a virtually unaltered transfer of chi2-macroglobulin between the intra- and extravascular space during pregnancy and a significantly increased extravascular fraction of albumin.

PMID:
17852800
DOI:
10.1080/00365510701203488
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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