Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Occup Environ Med. 2007 Sep;49(9):990-6.

Job strain, life events, and sickness absence: a longitudinal cohort study in a random population sample.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Lemminkäisenkatu 1, FIN 20014 University of Turku, Finland. sakari.suominen@utu.fi

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine job strain, adverse life events, and their co-occurrence as predictors of sickness absence.

METHODS:

Random sample-based mail survey data on 1806 Finns in gainful employment were linked to sickness absence records (1987-1998) from national health registers. Generalized linear models with negative binomial distribution assumption were applied.

RESULTS:

After adjustment for demographic characteristics and health behavior, job strain (rate ratio [RR] 1.73; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.21-2.48), but not life events, independently predicted increased rate of sickness absence among men. The opposite was true for women, (RR for life events 1.39; 95% CI = 1.10-1.75). No statistically significant interaction between job strain and life events was detected.

CONCLUSION:

In addition to job strain, strain originating in private life should be kept in mind when the need for sickness absence of women employees is evaluated within health care.

PMID:
17848855
DOI:
10.1097/JOM.0b013e3181343e2b
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer
Loading ...
Support Center