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Brain. 2007 Oct;130(Pt 10):2589-95. Epub 2007 Sep 7.

Parental smoking at home and the risk of childhood-onset multiple sclerosis in children.

Author information

1
Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Service de Neurologie Pédiatrique, Hôpital Bicêtre, INSERM U802, Université Paris Sud 11, Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France. yann.mikaeloff@bct.aphp.fr

Abstract

The possibility of a link between active smoking and incident multiple sclerosis (MS) has been raised. However, possible links between incidence of MS and passive smoking, particularly in children, have not been analysed. We conducted a population-based, case-control study. The cases were patients with incident MS occurring between 1994 and 2003, before the age of 16 years, in France. Each case was matched for age, sex and geographic origin with 12 controls, randomly selected from the French general population. Information about the smoking history of the parents of the cases and controls was collected with a standardized questionnaire. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the rate ratio (RR) of MS associated with parental smoking at home. The 129 cases of MS were matched with 1038 controls. Information about parental smoking was obtained for all these cases and controls. Exposure to parental smoking was noted in 62.0% of cases and 45.1% of controls. The adjusted RR of a first episode of MS associated with exposure to parental smoking at home was 2.12 (95% confidence interval: 1.43-3.15). Stratification for age showed that this increase in risk was significantly associated with the longer duration of exposure in older cases (over 10 years of age at the time of the index episode)-RR 2.49 (1.53-4.08)-than in younger cases. Children exposed to parent smoking have a higher MS risk. The duration of exposure also affects the level of risk.

PMID:
17827175
DOI:
10.1093/brain/awm198
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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