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Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Sep;86(3):625-32.

The 24-h carbohydrate oxidation rate in a human respiratory chamber predicts ad libitum food intake.

Author information

1
Phoenix Epidemiology and Clinical Research Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Phoenix, AZ, USA. nico.pannacciulli@amylin.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The 24-h respiratory quotient (24-h RQ) and 24-h carbohydrate balance (24-h CHO-Bal) are predictors of weight change. Whether these relations are mediated by the effects of substrate oxidation and balance on food intake is not known.

OBJECTIVE:

We tested whether substrate oxidation and balance predict future ad libitum food intake.

DESIGN:

Substrate oxidation and balance were measured in a respiratory chamber in 112 normoglycemic subjects (83 Pima Indians and 29 whites; 67 men and 45 women) in energy balance for 3 d before tests were performed. The subjects then self-selected their food ad libitum for the following 3 d.

RESULTS:

The 24-h RQ, 24-h carbohydrate oxidation (24-h CHO-Ox), and 24-h CHO-Bal in the respiratory chamber predicted subsequent ad libitum food intake over 3 d (as a percentage of weight maintenance energy needs; %EN-WM). The 24-h CHO-Ox explained 15% of the variance in %EN-WM. The weight change over the 3-d ad libitum period was associated positively with 24-h CHO-Ox and negatively with 24-h CHO-Bal in the chamber; these associations were no longer significant after adjustment for %EN-WM.

CONCLUSION:

Carbohydrate oxidation and balance predict subsequent ad libitum food intake and can influence short-term weight changes, which indicates that carbohydrate balance is a contributing metabolic factor affecting food intake.

PMID:
17823426
PMCID:
PMC2128058
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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