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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2009 Jan;63(1):93-9. Epub 2007 Sep 5.

Low serum selenium is associated with anemia among older adults in the United States.

Author information

1
The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. rdsemba@jhmi.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We hypothesized that low serum selenium was associated with anemia in humans.

SUBJECTS:

A total of 2092 adults aged 65 and older, in the third National Nutrition Examination Survey, Phase 2 (1991-1994) (NHANES III).

METHODS:

Examination of the relationship between serum selenium and hematological indices in NHANES III.

RESULTS:

Anemia, defined by World Health Organization criteria, was present in 12.9%. Mean serum selenium among non-anemic and anemic adults was 1.60 and 1.51 micromol l(-1) (P=0.0003). The prevalence of anemia among adults in the lowest to highest quartiles of serum selenium was 18.3, 9.5, 9.7 and 6.9%, respectively (P=0.0005). The proportion of adults in the lowest quartile of selenium among those who were non-anemic or who had anemia due to nutritional causes, chronic inflammation, renal disease or unexplained anemia was 9.9, 27.5, 17.5, 24.0 and 15.4%, respectively. An increase in log(e) selenium was associated with a reduced risk of anemia (odds ratio per one standard deviation increase 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.58-0.97, P=0.03), adjusting for age, race, education, body mass index and chronic diseases.

CONCLUSION:

Low serum selenium is independently associated with anemia among older men and women in the United States.

PMID:
17805227
PMCID:
PMC2645667
DOI:
10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602889
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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