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Head Neck. 2007 Dec;29(12):1136-43.

Craniofacial surgery for nonmelanoma skin malignancy: report of an international collaborative study.

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1
Head and Neck Service, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study examined the efficacy of craniofacial surgery (CFS) in treating locally advanced nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC).

METHODS:

One hundred twenty patients who underwent CFS for NMSC were identified from 17 participating institutions. Patient, tumor, and treatment information was analyzed for prognostic impact on survival.

RESULTS:

Surgical margins were negative in 74%, close in 3%, and involved in 23% of patients. Complications occurred in 35% of patients, half of which were local wound problems. Operative mortality was 4%. Median follow-up interval after CFS was 27 months. The 5-year overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and recurrence-free survival (RFS) rates were 64%, 75%, and 60%, respectively. Squamous cell histology, brain invasion, and positive resection margins independently predicted worse OS, DSS, and RFS.

CONCLUSION:

CFS is an effective treatment for patients with NMSC invading the skull base. Histology, extent of disease, and resection margins are the most significant predictors of outcome.

PMID:
17764086
DOI:
10.1002/hed.20656
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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