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Am J Crit Care. 2007 Sep;16(5):447-57.

Chronically critically ill patients: health-related quality of life and resource use after a disease management intervention.

Author information

  • 1School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA. SLD4@case.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Chronically critically ill patients often have high costs of care and poor outcomes and thus might benefit from a disease management program.

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate how adding a disease management program to the usual care system affects outcomes after discharge from the hospital (mortality, health-related quality of life, resource use) in chronically critically ill patients.

METHODS:

In a prospective experimental design, 335 intensive care patients who received more than 3 days of mechanical ventilation at a university medical center were recruited. For 8 weeks after discharge, advanced practice nurses provided an intervention that focused on case management and interdisciplinary communication to patients in the experimental group.

RESULTS:

A total of 74.0% of the patients survived and completed the study. Significant predictors of death were age (P = .001), duration of mechanical ventilation (P = .001), and history of diabetes (P = .04). The disease management program did not have a significant impact on health-related quality of life; however, a greater percentage of patients in the experimental group than in the control group had "improved" physical health-related quality of life at the end of the intervention period (P = .02). The only significant effect of the intervention was a reduction in the number of days of hospital readmission and thus a reduction in charges associated with readmission.

CONCLUSION:

The intervention was not associated with significant changes in any outcomes other than duration of readmission, but the supportive care coordination program could be provided without increasing overall charges.

PMID:
17724242
PMCID:
PMC2040111
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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