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Biol Psychiatry. 2008 Mar 1;63(5):512-8. Epub 2007 Aug 27.

Diffusion tensor imaging of the superior longitudinal fasciculus and working memory in recent-onset schizophrenia.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1563, USA. karlsgodt@psych.ucla.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Structural and functional abnormalities in frontal-parietal circuitry are thought to be associated with working memory (WM) deficits in patients with schizophrenia. This study examines whether recent-onset schizophrenia is associated with anatomical changes in the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), the main frontal-parietal white matter connection, and whether the integrity of the SLF is related to WM performance.

METHODS:

We applied a novel registration approach (Tract-Based Spatial Statistics [TBSS]) to diffusion tensor imaging data to examine fractional anisotropy (FA) in the left and right SLF in 12 young adult patients with recent-onset schizophrenia and 17 matched control subjects.

RESULTS:

Schizophrenia patients showed lower FA values than control subjects across the entire SLF, with particular deficits on the left SLF. Fractional anisotropy values were correlated with performance on a verbal WM task in both patient and control groups in the left but not right SLF.

CONCLUSIONS:

Recent-onset schizophrenia patients show deficits in frontal-parietal connections, key components of WM circuitry. Moreover, the integrity of this physiological connection predicted performance on a verbal WM task, indicating that this structural change may have important functional implications. These findings support the view that schizophrenia is a disorder of brain connectivity and implicate white matter changes detectable in the early phases of the illness as one source of this dysfunction.

PMID:
17720147
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopsych.2007.06.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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