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Science. 2007 Aug 24;317(5841):1090-3.

Blue-light-activated histidine kinases: two-component sensors in bacteria.

Author information

1
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, USA.

Abstract

Histidine kinases, used for environmental sensing by bacterial two-component systems, are involved in regulation of bacterial gene expression, chemotaxis, phototaxis, and virulence. Flavin-containing domains function as light-sensory modules in plant and algal phototropins and in fungal blue-light receptors. We have discovered that the prokaryotes Brucella melitensis, Brucella abortus, Erythrobacter litoralis, and Pseudomonas syringae contain light-activated histidine kinases that bind a flavin chromophore and undergo photochemistry indicative of cysteinyl-flavin adduct formation. Infection of macrophages by B. abortus was stimulated by light in the wild type but was limited in photochemically inactive and null mutants, indicating that the flavin-containing histidine kinase functions as a photoreceptor regulating B. abortus virulence.

PMID:
17717187
DOI:
10.1126/science.1144306
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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