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Am J Pathol. 2007 Oct;171(4):1199-214. Epub 2007 Aug 23.

Minocycline modulates neuroinflammation independently of its antimicrobial activity in staphylococcus aureus-induced brain abscess.

Author information

1
Department of Neurobiology and Developmental Sciences, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham St., Slot 846, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA. kieliantammyl@uams.edu

Abstract

Minocycline exerts beneficial immune modulatory effects in several noninfectious neurodegenerative disease models; however, its potential to influence the host immune response during central nervous system bacterial infections, such as brain abscess, has not yet been investigated. Using a minocycline-resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus to dissect the antibiotic's bacteriostatic versus immune modulatory effects in a mouse experimental brain abscess model, we found that minocycline significantly reduced mortality rates within the first 24 hours following bacterial exposure. This protection was associated with a transient decrease in the expression of several proinflammatory mediators, including interleukin-1beta and CCL2 (MCP-1). Minocycline was also capable of protecting the brain parenchyma from necrotic damage as evident by significantly smaller abscesses in minocycline-treated mice. In addition, minocycline exerted anti-inflammatory effects when administered as late as 3 days following S. aureus infection, which correlated with a significant decrease in brain abscess size. Finally, minocycline was capable of partially attenuating S. aureus-dependent microglial and astrocyte activation. Therefore, minocycline may afford additional therapeutic benefits extending beyond its antimicrobial activity for the treatment of central nervous system infectious diseases typified by a pathogenic inflammatory component through its ability to balance beneficial versus detrimental inflammation.

PMID:
17717149
PMCID:
PMC1988870
DOI:
10.2353/ajpath.2007.070231
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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