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Neurobiol Aging. 1991 Sep-Oct;12(5):469-73.

Inositol phosphates and intracellular calcium after bradykinin stimulation in fibroblasts from young, normal aged and Alzheimer donors.

Author information

1
Burke Medical Research Institute, Department of Neurology and Neuroscience, Cornell University Medical College, White Plains, NY 10605.

Abstract

Several studies suggest that alterations in the receptor-mediated phosphoinositide cascade and cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) are involved in the pathophysiology of aging and Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, the phosphoinositide cascade and [Ca2+]i were determined under resting conditions and after stimulation with bradykinin (100 nM) in cultured human skin fibroblasts from young (21 +/- 3 years), normal aged (59 +/- 6 years) and Alzheimer subjects (58 +/- 6 years). The inositol polyphosphates (IP3, IP2 and IP) were monitored after prelabeling the cells with [3H]inositol in serum free medium. [Ca2+]i was determined with the fluorescent probe, fura-2AM, under exactly analogous conditions. The bradykinin-induced formation of IP3 and IP2 increased significantly in fibroblasts from normal aged and Alzheimer donors compared to young subjects, but did not differ from each other. Bradykinin-induced IP3 formation was 63-117% above the young group at time points between 10-60 s in normal aged or Alzheimer donors. Bradykinin-induced IP2 formation was 49-59% above the young group at time points between 10-60 s in normal aged or Alzheimer subjects. Neither the basal [Ca2+]i, nor the bradykinin-stimulated [Ca2+]i, differed among fibroblasts from young, normal aged and Alzheimer donors. The precise molecular basis and pathophysiological significance of the enhanced bradykinin-induced phosphoinositide cascade in fibroblasts from aged donors remains to be determined.

PMID:
1770982
DOI:
10.1016/0197-4580(91)90075-u
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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