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J Biomech. 2007;40(16):3725-31. Epub 2007 Aug 17.

Anterior hip joint force increases with hip extension, decreased gluteal force, or decreased iliopsoas force.

Author information

1
Human Neuromechanics Laboratory, Division of Kinesiology, University of Michigan, 401 Washtenaw Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2214, USA. lewis@wustl.edu

Abstract

Abnormal or excessive force on the anterior hip joint may cause anterior hip pain, subtle hip instability and a tear of the acetabular labrum. We propose that both the pattern of muscle force and hip joint position can affect the magnitude of anterior joint force and thus possibly lead to excessive force and injury. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of hip joint position and of weakness of the gluteal and iliopsoas muscles on anterior hip joint force. We used a musculoskeletal model to estimate hip joint forces during simulated prone hip extension and supine hip flexion under four different muscle force conditions and across a range of hip extension and flexion positions. Weakness of specified muscles was simulated by decreasing the modeled maximum force value for the gluteal muscles during hip extension and the iliopsoas muscle during hip flexion. We found that decreased force contribution from the gluteal muscles during hip extension and the iliopsoas muscle during hip flexion resulted in an increase in the anterior hip joint force. The anterior hip joint force was greater when the hip was in extension than when the hip was in flexion. Further studies are warranted to determine if increased utilization of the gluteal muscles during hip extension and of the iliopsoas muscle during hip flexion, and avoidance of hip extension beyond neutral would be beneficial for people with anterior hip pain, subtle hip instability, or an anterior acetabular labral tear.

PMID:
17707385
PMCID:
PMC2580726
DOI:
10.1016/j.jbiomech.2007.06.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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