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Int J Impot Res. 2008 Mar-Apr;20(2):157-61. Epub 2007 Aug 16.

Hypogonadism is associated with overt depression symptoms in men with erectile dysfunction.

Author information

1
Department of Urologic Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. makhl001@umn.edu

Erratum in

  • Int J Impot Res. 2008 Mar-Apr;20(2):229. Neiderberger, C [corrected to Niederberger, C].

Abstract

Depression and hypogonadism are associated with erectile dysfunction (ED). We evaluated the prevalence of both conditions in men presenting to an ED specialty clinic, and tested whether hypogonadism correlated with the presence of depressive symptoms using a validated questionnaire. From July 2001 to June 2003, 157 men referred to an ED specialty clinic prospectively filled the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), the abbreviated International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) and had testosterone serum levels drawn. Median age was 53 (range=21-85 years). Hypogonadism, defined as serum T (testosterone)<300 mg/dl, was present in 36% of patients. This proportion was higher in men over the median age compared to younger patients (45 and 26%, respectively, P=0.002). Overt depression symptoms, defined as a CES-D> or =22, were found in 24% of men. Mean age of men with overt depression was 49.9+/-10.1 years vs 55.1+/-15.8 years for those with CES-D<22 (P=0.02). Hypogonadal men were more likely to have overt depression scores compared to eugonadal counterparts (35 vs 18%, P=0.02). This association was statistically stronger after correcting for age in a multivariate linear model (P=0.005). The relative risk of having overt depression was 1.94 times higher in men with hypogonadal testosterone level (95% confidence interval: 1.13 to 3.7). We conclude that in an ED referral population, symptoms of hypogonadism and depression symptoms are fairly prevalent, and that overt depression symptoms are strongly associated with hypogonadism. Clinicians should consider testosterone measurements in all men with high depression symptom scores.

PMID:
17703222
DOI:
10.1038/sj.ijir.3901576
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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