Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2007 Sep;2(5):883-8. Epub 2007 Aug 16.

Low urine pH: a novel feature of the metabolic syndrome.

Author information

1
The Charles and Jane Pak Center for Mineral Metabolism and Clinical Research, Dallas, Texas, USA. naim.maalouf@utsouthwestern.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

The metabolic syndrome is associated with alterations in renal function. An overly acidic urine has been described as a renal manifestation of the metabolic syndrome in patients with kidney stone disease. This study examined the association between the metabolic syndrome and urine pH in individuals without a history of nephrolithiasis.

DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS:

A total of 148 adults who were free of kidney stones were evaluated in this outpatient cross-sectional study. Height, weight, BP, fasting blood, and 24-h urine chemistries were obtained. Urine pH was measured by pH electrode. The following features of the metabolic syndrome were evaluated: BP; body mass index; and serum triglyceride, glucose, and HDL cholesterol concentrations. The degree of insulin resistance was assessed by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance.

RESULTS:

Participants with the metabolic syndrome had a significantly lower 24-h urine pH compared with participants without the metabolic syndrome. Mean 24-h urine pH, adjusted for age, gender, creatinine clearance, and 24-h urine sulfate, decreased from 6.15, 6.10, 5.99, 5.85, to 5.69 with increasing number of metabolic syndrome abnormalities. An association was observed between 24-h urine pH and each metabolic feature. After adjustment for age, gender, creatinine clearance, urine sulfate, and body mass index, a significant inverse relationship was noted between 24-h urine pH and the degree of insulin resistance.

CONCLUSIONS:

An unduly acidic urine is a feature of the metabolic syndrome and is associated with the degree of insulin resistance.

Comment in

PMID:
17702734
DOI:
10.2215/CJN.00670207
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center