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J Mater Sci Mater Med. 2008 Mar;19(3):1043-9. Epub 2007 Aug 15.

Effect of biological implant surface coatings on bone formation, applying collagen, proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans and growth factors.

Author information

1
Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany. stadlinger@gmx.de

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of the present study was to evaluate six different implant surface coatings with respect to bone formation. Being major structural components of the extracellular matrix, collagen, the non-collagenous components decorin/chondroitin sulphate (CS) and the growth factors TGF-beta1/BMP-4 served in different combinations as coatings of experimental titanium implants.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Eight miniature pigs received each six implants in the mandible. The implant design showed two circular recesses along the length axis. Three, four, five and six weeks after implant placement, the animals were sacrificed in groups of two. Bone-implant contact (BIC) was evaluated along the outer implant surface and within the recesses. Bone volume was determined by synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography (SRmicroCT) for one implant of each surface state, 6 weeks after placement.

RESULTS:

At each week of observation, collagen/CS or collagen/CS/BMP-4 coated implants showed the highest BIC of all surface states. This was statistically significant at week five (p=0.030, p=0.040) and six (p=0.025, p=0.005). SRmicroCT measurements determined the highest bone volume for a collagen/CS coated implant.

CONCLUSION:

The results indicate that collagen/CS and collagen/CS/BMP-4 lead to a higher degree of bone formation compared to other ECM components.

PMID:
17701311
DOI:
10.1007/s10856-007-3077-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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