Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2007 Dec;1121:610-38. Epub 2007 Aug 14.

Orbitofrontal cortex and cognitive-motivational impairments in psychostimulant addiction: evidence from experiments in the non-human primate.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Division of Molecular Psychiatry, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06508, USA. peter.olausson@yale.edu

Abstract

Addiction is characterized by compulsive drug use despite adverse consequences. The precise psychobiological changes that underlie the progression from casual use to loss of control over drug-seeking and drug-taking behavior are not well understood. Here we report that short-term cocaine exposure in monkeys is sufficient to produce both selective deficits in cognitive functions dependent on the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) concurrent with enhancements in motivational processes involving limbic-striatal regions. Additional findings from behavioral studies and analyses of the synaptic proteome provide new behavioral and biochemical evidence that cocaine-induced neuroadaptations in cortical and subcortical brain regions result in dysfunctional decision-making abilities and loss of impulse control that in combination with enhancements of incentive motivation may contribute to the development of compulsive behavior in addiction.

PMID:
17698993
DOI:
10.1196/annals.1401.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley
    Loading ...
    Support Center