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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2007 Nov;92(11):4230-5. Epub 2007 Aug 14.

Exercise alone reduces insulin resistance in obese children independently of changes in body composition.

Author information

1
Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, Centre for Child Health Research, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia 6009, Australia.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

The number of obese children with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes is increasing, but the best management strategy is not clear.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to assess the effect of a structured 8-wk exercise training program on insulin resistance and changes in body composition in obese children.

DESIGN:

The study was 8 wk of structured supervised exercise intervention with outcome measures before and after the exercise period.

SUBJECTS:

Fourteen obese children (12.70 +/- 2.32 yr; eight male, six female) with high fasting insulin levels were enrolled into the study.

INTERVENTION:

INTERVENTION consisted of 8 wk of supervised circuit-based exercise training, composed of three fully supervised 1-h sessions per week.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

Outcome measures were assessed pretraining program and posttraining program and included insulin sensitivity (euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp studies), fasting insulin and glucose levels, body composition using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry scan, lipid profile, and liver function tests.

RESULTS:

Insulin sensitivity improved significantly after 8 wk of training (M(lbm) 8.20 +/- 3.44 to 10.03 +/- 4.33 mg/kg.min, P < 0.05). Submaximal exercise heart rate responses were significantly lower following the training (P < 0.05), indicating an improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry scans revealed no differences in lean body mass or abdominal fat mass.

CONCLUSION:

An 8-wk exercise training program increases insulin sensitivity in obese children, and this improvement occurred in the presence of increased cardiorespiratory fitness but is independent of measurable changes in body composition.

PMID:
17698905
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2007-0779
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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