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Clin Ther. 2007 May;29(5):763-777. doi: 10.1016/j.clinthera.2007.05.002.

Hypertriglyceridemia and cardiovascular risk reduction.

Author information

1
Office of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Electronic address: tjaco02@emory.edu.
2
Division of Cardiology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
3
Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Elevated triglyceride (TG) levels are prevalent among the US population, often occurring in persons who are overweight or obese, or who have type 2 diabetes or the metabolic syndrome. There is evidence that elevated TG levels may be a significant independent risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD), particularly in women.

OBJECTIVE:

This article reviews data on the epidemiology, associated risks, treatment, and prevention of hypertriglyceridemia, including recommended TG goals and available TG-lowering agents.

METHODS:

MEDLINE was searched for articles published from 1990 through 2006 using the terms hypertriglyceridemia, dyslipidemia, and coronary heart disease, with subheadings for risk, statins, niacin, fibrates, thiazolidinediones, and omega-3 fatty acids. The reference lists of relevant articles were examined for additional citations. Publications discussing the epidemiology of hypertriglyceridemia, CHD risk, treatment guidelines for lipid management, clinical trials involving TG-lowering drugs, and outcomes for lipid-modifying therapies were selected for review.

RESULTS:

Concern over the increasing rate of hypertriglyceridemia and its deleterious health consequences is reflected in the most recent National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines. Several lipid-lowering agents are available, including statins, fibrates, niacin, thiazolidinediones, and prescription omega-3 fatty acids. Clinical trials of these drugs have reported lowering of TG by 7% to 50%. Along with lifestyle changes, the use of combination pharmacotherapy to reduce lipid levels (including TG) may be an effective strategy in patients with dyslipidemia.

CONCLUSION:

Use of strategies to manage TG levels, along with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, is warranted to help reduce the risk of CHD.

PMID:
17697898
DOI:
10.1016/j.clinthera.2007.05.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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