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Stroke. 2007 Sep;38(9):2569-76. Epub 2007 Aug 9.

Novel thyroxine derivatives, thyronamine and 3-iodothyronamine, induce transient hypothermia and marked neuroprotection against stroke injury.

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1
Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Mild hypothermia confers profound neuroprotection in ischemia. We recently discovered 2 natural derivatives of thyroxine, 3-iodothyronamine (T(1)AM) and thyronamine (T(0)AM), that when administered to rodents lower body temperature for several hours without induction of a compensatory homeostatic response. We tested whether T(1)AM- and T(0)AM-induced hypothermia protects against brain injury from experimental stroke.

METHODS:

We tested T(1)AM and T(0)AM 1 hour after and 2 days before stroke in a mouse model of focal ischemia. To determine whether T(1)AM and T(0)AM require hypothermia to protect against stroke injury, the induction of hypothermia was prevented.

RESULTS:

T(1)AM and T(0)AM administration reduced body temperature from 37 degrees C to 31 degrees C. Mice given T(1)AM or T(0)AM after the ischemic period had significantly smaller infarcts compared with controls. Mice preconditioned with T(1)AM before ischemia displayed significantly smaller infarcts compared with controls. Pre- and postischemia treatments required the induction of hypothermia. T(1)AM and T(0)AM treatment in vitro failed to confer neuroprotection against ischemia.

CONCLUSIONS:

T(1)AM and T(0)AM, are potent neuroprotectants in acute stroke and T(1)AM can be used as antecedent treatment to induce neuroprotection against subsequent ischemia. Hypothermia induced by T(1)AM and T(0)AM may underlie neuroprotection. T(1)AM and T(0)AM offer promise as treatments for brain injury.

PMID:
17690312
DOI:
10.1161/STROKEAHA.106.480277
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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