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Respir Med. 2007 Nov;101(11):2370-7. Epub 2007 Aug 8.

Outcome and severity of adult onset asthma--report from the obstructive lung disease in northern Sweden studies (OLIN).

Author information

1
The OLIN Studies, Department of Medicine, Sunderby Central Hospital of Norrbotten, Luleå, Sweden. eva.ronmark@telia.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Studies of longitudinal changes in severity and the long-term outcome of asthma in epidemiological settings are uncommon.

AIM:

To assess the outcome of incident asthma in a cohort of subjects who developed asthma after the age of 20 years.

METHODS:

This is a prospective study of the outcome of 309 subjects with incident asthma being included in a case-referent study based on all adults aged 20-60 years living in three municipalities/towns in Northern Sweden. The subjects fulfilled the criteria for incident asthma defined as onset of symptoms common in asthma within 12 months prior to the study and a verified bronchial variability. In 2003, 250 (81%) of the subjects with asthma were re-examined with structured interview, lung-function test and methacholine test.

RESULTS:

At follow-up, 237 (95%) subjects still had an active asthma, i.e. they had symptoms or used asthma medicines. Among those with active asthma, 65% were using inhaled cortico-steroids. Severity grading (GINA 2000) showed that 21% had mild intermittent asthma, 30% mild persistent, 44% moderate persistent, and 5% severe asthma, contrasting to 75% with moderate or severe asthma at entry. Higher age, higher BMI and low lung function were associated with greater asthma severity. Twelve subjects (5%) were in remission. Predictors for remission were non-sensitisation and a normal lung function. Age, sex, BMI, and smoking habits were not significantly different between those in remission and those not.

CONCLUSIONS:

Remission of adult onset asthma was low. Severity of asthma changed considerably over time, however, the overall change was towards a milder disease probably as a result of treatment.

PMID:
17689949
DOI:
10.1016/j.rmed.2007.06.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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