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J Perinat Med. 2007;35(5):447-54.

Impact of being small-for-gestational age on survival and long-term outcome of extremely premature infants born at 23-27 weeks' gestation.

Author information

1
Maternal and Perinatal Center, School of Medicine, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, Japan. ykono@boshi.twmu.ac.jp

Abstract

AIM:

To evaluate factors affecting survival and long-term outcome of extremely premature infants and to determine whether small for gestational age (SGA) status is an additional risk factor.

METHODS:

Survival was analyzed in 193 infants born between 23 and 27 weeks of gestational age (GA) and compared between SGA (n=43) and appropriate for gestational age (AGA) infants. Long-term outcome was assessed in 123 infants at six years of chronological age by neurological evaluation and cognitive tests.

RESULTS:

The long-term survival rates were 72.1% for SGA and 84.0% for AGA infants. Significant independent factors affecting survival were GA (OR 1.79 for one week advance, 95% CI 1.36-2.34) and SGA (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.18-0.997) in comparison with AGA. There were no significant differences in rates of cerebral palsy or mental retardation, 12.0% and 24.0% in SGA, 14.3% and 17.3% in AGA, respectively. Fifty-two percent of SGA and 70% of AGA infants had intact long-term outcome. The perinatal factor found to affect the intact long-term outcome was RDS with surfactant therapy (OR 0.17, 95% CI 0.07-0.45).

CONCLUSION:

SGA status as well as short gestation had significant effects on survival. Respiratory complications after birth had a larger detrimental effect on long-term outcome than whether the infant was SGA or AGA.

PMID:
17685857
DOI:
10.1515/JPM.2007.098
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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