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PLoS Med. 2007 Aug;4(8):e250.

How evidence-based are the recommendations in evidence-based guidelines?

Author information

1
The Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. Finlay.McAlister@ualberta.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Treatment recommendations for the same condition from different guideline bodies often disagree, even when the same randomized controlled trial (RCT) evidence is cited. Guideline appraisal tools focus on methodology and quality of reporting, but not on the nature of the supporting evidence. This study was done to evaluate the quality of the evidence (based on consideration of its internal validity, clinical relevance, and applicability) underlying therapy recommendations in evidence-based clinical practice guidelines.

METHODS AND FINDINGS:

A cross-sectional analysis of cardiovascular risk management recommendations was performed for three different conditions (diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and hypertension) from three pan-national guideline panels (from the United States, Canada, and Europe). Of the 338 treatment recommendations in these nine guidelines, 231 (68%) cited RCT evidence but only 105 (45%) of these RCT-based recommendations were based on high-quality evidence. RCT-based evidence was downgraded most often because of reservations about the applicability of the RCT to the populations specified in the guideline recommendation (64/126 cases, 51%) or because the RCT reported surrogate outcomes (59/126 cases, 47%).

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of internally valid RCTs may not be applicable to the populations, interventions, or outcomes specified in a guideline recommendation and therefore should not always be assumed to provide high-quality evidence for therapy recommendations.

PMID:
17683197
PMCID:
PMC1939859
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pmed.0040250
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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