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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2007 Aug;161(8):730-9.

Effects of a school-based, early childhood intervention on adult health and well-being: a 19-year follow-up of low-income families.

Author information

1
Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota, 51 E River Rd, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. ajr@umn.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the effects of an established preventive intervention on the health and well-being of an urban cohort in young adulthood.

DESIGN:

Follow-up of a nonrandomized alternative-intervention matched-group cohort at age 24 years.

SETTING:

Chicago, Illinois.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 1539 low-income participants who enrolled in the Child-Parent Center program in 20 sites or in an alternative kindergarten intervention.

INTERVENTIONS:

The Child-Parent Center program provides school-based educational enrichment and comprehensive family services from preschool to third grade.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Educational attainment, adult arrest and incarceration, health status and behavior, and economic well-being.

RESULTS:

Relative to the comparison group and adjusted for many covariates, Child-Parent Center preschool participants had higher rates of school completion (63.7% vs 71.4%, respectively; P = .01) and attendance in 4-year colleges as well as more years of education. They were more likely to have health insurance coverage (61.5% vs 70.2%, respectively; P = .005). Preschool graduates relative to the comparison group also had lower rates of felony arrests (16.5% vs 21.1%, respectively; P = .02), convictions, incarceration (20.6% vs 25.6%, respectively; P = .03), depressive symptoms (12.8% vs 17.4%, respectively; P=.06), and out-of-home placement. Participation in both preschool and school-age intervention relative to the comparison group was associated with higher rates of full-time employment (42.7% vs 36.4%, respectively; P = .04), higher levels of educational attainment, lower rates of arrests for violent offenses, and lower rates of disability.

CONCLUSIONS:

Participation in a school-based intervention beginning in preschool was associated with a wide range of positive outcomes. Findings provide evidence that established early education programs can have enduring effects on general well-being into adulthood.

PMID:
17679653
DOI:
10.1001/archpedi.161.8.730
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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