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Am J Med. 2007 Aug;120(8):734.e1-9. Epub 2007 Mar 21.

African Americans at risk for increased iron stores or liver disease.

Author information

1
Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Howard University, Washington, DC, USA. fdawkins@obius.jnj.com

Abstract

PURPOSE:

We sought to determine the prevalence of elevated measures of iron status in African Americans and whether the combination of serum ferritin concentration >200 microg/L for women or >300 microg/L for men and transferrin saturation in the highest quartile represents increased likelihood of mutation of HFE, self-reported iron overload or self-reported liver disease.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

A cross-sectional observational study of 27,224 African Americans > or =25 years of age recruited in a primary care setting was conducted as part of the multi-center, multi-ethnic Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study. Measurements included serum ferritin concentration, transferrin saturation, testing for HFE C282Y and H63D, and self-reported iron overload and liver disease.

RESULTS:

Serum ferritin concentration >200 microg/L for women or >300 microg/L for men occurred in 5263 (19.3%) of African Americans, while serum ferritin concentration in this range with highest-quartile transferrin saturation (>29% women; >35% men) occurred in 1837 (6.7%). Adjusted odds of HFE mutation (1.76 women, 1.67 men), self-reported iron overload (1.97 women, 2.88 men), or self-reported liver disease (5.18 women, 3.73 men) were greater with elevated serum ferritin concentration and highest-quartile transferrin saturation than with nonelevated serum ferritin concentration (each P <.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Serum ferritin concentration >200 microg/L for women or >300 microg/L for men in combination with transferrin saturation >29% for women or >35% for men occurs in approximately 7% of adult African American primary care patients. Patients with this combination of iron test results should be evaluated for increased body iron stores or liver disease.

PMID:
17679134
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjmed.2006.05.049
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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