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J Biomech. 2008;41(1):165-70. Epub 2007 Aug 3.

Implications of increased medio-lateral trunk sway for ambulatory mechanics.

Author information

1
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Durand Building 205, Stanford, CA 94305-4038, USA. amuender@stanford.edu

Abstract

The purposes of this study was to test a mechanism to reduce the knee adduction moment by testing the hypothesis that increased medio-lateral trunk sway can reduce the knee adduction moment during ambulation in healthy subjects, and to examine the possibility that increasing medio-lateral trunk sway can produce similar potentially adverse secondary gait changes previously associated with reduced knee adduction moments in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Nineteen healthy adults performed walking trials with normal and increased medio-lateral trunk sway at a self-selected normal walking speed. Standard gait analysis was used to calculate three-dimensional lower extremity joint kinematics and kinetics. Knee and hip adduction moments were lower (-65.0% and -57.1%, respectively) for the increased medio-lateral trunk sway trials than for the normal trunk sway trials. Knee flexion angle at heel-strike was 3 degrees higher for the increased than for the normal trunk sway trials. Knee and hip abduction moments were higher for the increased medio-lateral trunk sway trials, and none of the other variables differed between the two conditions. Walking with increased medio-lateral trunk sway substantially reduces the knee adduction moment during walking in healthy subjects without some of the adverse secondary effects such as increased axial loading rates at the major joints of the lower extremity. This result supports the potential of using gait retraining for walking with increased medio-lateral trunk sway as treatment for patients with degenerative joint disease such as medial compartment knee osteoarthritis.

PMID:
17678933
DOI:
10.1016/j.jbiomech.2007.07.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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