Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur J Ophthalmol. 2007 Jul-Aug;17(4):642-7.

Risk factors for post-traumatic endophthalmitis in patients with positive intraocular cultures.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology and Preventive and Social Medicine, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Pondicherry 605 006, India. arvind_ophthal@yahoo.co.in

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To determine the risk factors for post-traumatic endophthalmitis in patients with positive intraocular culture.

METHODS:

An institutional-based prospective nonrandomized interventional study of patients older than 15 years who presented for primary repair of open globe injury between June 2003 and April 2005 was undertaken. The main outcomes measured were initial and final visual acuity, type of injury, presence of uveal and vitreous prolapse, time interval between injury and primary repair of the globe, length of wound, location of wound, and virulence of organism. Statistical analysis tests used were Student t-test, Fisher exact test, and chi-square test.

RESULTS:

Fifty patients were included in the study. They were divided into two groups: Group 1 (n=19) patients, who developed clinically significant endophthalmitis; and Group 2 (n=31) patients, who did not develop clinically significant endophthalmitis. Delay in primary repair more than 36 hours (p=0.042), length of wound more than 8 mm (p=0.050), and isolation of organisms like fungus (p=0.006, OR=14), Bacillus cereus (p=0.01, OR=11.25), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (p=0.05-0.10, OR=11.3) significantly increased the risk of endophthalmitis. Mean initial and final visual acuity was better in Group 2 but was not statistically significant (p=0.21).

CONCLUSIONS:

Final visual outcome in the presence of positive intraocular culture is poor. Isolation of virulent organisms, longer length of laceration, and delayed primary repair of open globe injuries have high risk of developing endophthalmitis. Prophylactic intraocular antibiotics should be considered in cases with longer length of wound and delayed primary closure.

PMID:
17671943
DOI:
10.1177/112067210701700425
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center