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Eur J Ophthalmol. 2007 Jul-Aug;17(4):534-7.

Visual field damage and progression in glaucomatous myopic eyes.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, Sant'Andrea Hospital, La Sapienza II University, via di Villa Chigi 65, 00199 Rome, Italy. andreap@spinweb.it

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To make a visual field retrospective analysis on a group of patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) and to evaluate whether different refractive errors could have different progression of the 30 degrees central sensitivity.

METHODS:

A total of 110 patients with POAG (52 men and 58 women) were included in the study. All the patients were divided into four subgroups based on the refractive error. The visual field of all the included patients was assessed by an Octopus 30 degrees central visual field every 6 months, for a total of 837 visual fields examined. The resulting data were analyzed by PERIDATA for Windows 1.7 TREND function. Mean defect (MD) and loss variance (LV) were considered for the analysis.

RESULTS:

At the first examination, 82% of eyes showed a global decrease of differential light sensitivity (MD >2 dB) and in 67% the distribution of the defect was nonhomogeneous (LV >6 dB). The analysis of variance for subgroups showed a more significant decrease of MD in highly myopic patients. A linear regression analysis highlighted a statistically significant change in time of MD in 36% and of LV in 34% of the eyes studied. Highly myopic patients had the highest (p<0.01) percentage of change of MD and LV (46% and 42%, respectively). Among the four subgroups, there was no difference in progression of MD decrease in time.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results showed that after 5 years of glaucoma, the visual field was altered in most of the eyes examined (82%) and that in 67% of cases, its defect was nonhomogeneous and worsened with the increase of myopia. The regression linear analysis of visual field changes in time showed a progressive increase of MD and LV in approximately one third of all the eyes examined.

PMID:
17671927
DOI:
10.1177/112067210701700409
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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