Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Public Health. 2008 Apr;98(4):751-7. Epub 2007 Jul 31.

Food insecurity and obesity: a comparison of self-reported and measured height and weight.

Author information

1
School of Social Work, Lakehead University, 955 Oliver Rd, Thunder Bay, P7B 5E1, Ontario.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We used self-reported and measured height and weight data to examine the relationship between food insecurity and obesity.

METHODS:

We defined food insecurity according to 3 different models. We used self-reported and measured height and weight from 2 versions of the Canadian Community Health Survey to calculate obesity rates.

RESULTS:

When self-reported height and weight data were used in calculating obesity prevalence rates, rates were significantly higher among food-insecure respondents than among food-secure respondents; by contrast, when measured height and weight data were used, there were no significant differences. Female respondents classified as food insecure and experiencing mild hunger were at greater risk of obesity than were food-secure female respondents when measured height and weight were used.

CONCLUSIONS:

Associations between obesity and food insecurity are more pronounced when self-reported data on height and weight are used than when measured height and weight data are used. Caution should be used when using self-reported data to examine the relationship between food insecurity and obesity.

PMID:
17666697
PMCID:
PMC2377006
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2006.093211
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center