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Acta Ophthalmol. 2008 Mar;86(2):126-45. Epub 2007 Jul 28.

Central serous chorioretinopathy.

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1
Department of Ophthalmology, Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Abstract

Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) is a disease of the retina characterized by serous detachment of the neurosensory retina secondary to one or more focal lesions of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). CSC occurs most frequently in mid-life and more often in men than in women. Major symptoms are blurred vision, usually in one eye only and perceived typically by the patient as a dark spot in the centre of the visual field with associated micropsia and metamorphopsia. Normal vision often recurs spontaneously within a few months. The condition can be precipitated by psychosocial stress and hypercortisolism. Ophthalmoscopic signs of CSC range from mono- or paucifocal RPE lesions with prominent elevation of the neurosensory retina by clear fluid - typical of cases of recent onset - to shallow detachments overlying large patches of irregularly depigmented RPE. The spectrum of lesions includes RPE detachments. Granular or fibrinous material may accumulate in the subretinal cavity. Serous detachment often resolves spontaneously. From first contact, counselling about the potential relation to stress and glucocorticoid medication is warranted. After 3 months without resolution of acute CSC or in chronic CSC, treatment should be considered. Resolution of detachment can usually be achieved in acute CSC by focal photocoagulation of leaking RPE lesions or, in chronic CSC, by photodynamic therapy. The effect of therapy on long-term visual outcome is insufficiently documented. Reattachment within 4 months of onset is considered a relevant therapeutic target because prolonged detachment is associated with photoreceptor atrophy. This suggests that the value of treatment depends upon proper selection of cases that will not resolve without therapy. Chronic CSC may be difficult to differentiate from occult choroidal neovascularization secondary to CSC. Patients with chronic CSC who receive glucocorticoid treatment for systemic disease can often be managed without having to discontinue this medication.

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