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Future Microbiol. 2007 Apr;2(2):153-64.

Evolving epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Burkholderia cepacia complex in cystic fibrosis lung infection.

Author information

1
University of Edinburgh, Cystic Fibrosis Group, Centre for Infectious Diseases, Edinburgh, UK. john.r.w.govan@ed.ac.uk

Abstract

The morbidity and mortality of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is primarily determined by chronic and debilitating lung infections caused by a surprisingly narrow spectrum of bacterial pathogens. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is by far the most prevalent life-threatening CF pathogen. In the absence of aggressive early therapy, it infects the majority of adult patients and determines long-term survival. The epidemiology of CF pulmonary infections continues to evolve. Amongst the most recent CF pathogens to have emerged are a group of closely related bacteria, known as the Burkholderia cepacia complex. These organisms are a particular challenge due to inherent antibiotic resistance, the potential for patient-to-patient spread, and the risk of 'cepacia syndrome', a rapid fulminating pneumonia sometimes accompanied by bacteremia. Strict cross-infection control was prompted by early epidemiological experience of the B. cepacia complex and is essential in the management of all CF pathogens.

PMID:
17661652
DOI:
10.2217/17460913.2.2.153
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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