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Am J Ophthalmol. 2007 Aug;144(2):313-5.

Spectrum of eye disease caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

Author information

  • 1F I Proctor Foundation, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA. jfleigh@gmail.com

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To compare the clinical features and antibiotic susceptibility of ocular methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA).

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study.

METHODS:

The Proctor clinical laboratory database was reviewed to identify all ocular isolates of S. aureus collected between July 1, 1998 and July 31, 2006.

RESULTS:

Of 915 S. aureus isolates, there were 88 MRSA isolates in 41 different patients. The proportion MRSA increased from 4.1% in 1998 to 1999 to 16.7% in 2005 to 2006. A total of 78.0% of patients with MRSA had blepharoconjunctivitis, 2.4% had cellulitis, 2.4% had dacryocystitis, 14.6% had keratitis, and 2.4% had endophthalmitis. The diagnoses associated with MSSA were not statistically different. A total of 63.6% of MRSA isolates were sensitive to bacitracin, 100% to vancomycin, 14.8% to ciprofloxacin, 14.8% to erythromycin, 97.7% to sulfisoxazole, and 93.2% to tetracycline.

CONCLUSIONS:

MRSA has become a more common ocular pathogen but, as with MSSA, causes mild disease. MRSA should be treated with vancomycin.

PMID:
17659970
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajo.2007.03.032
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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