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World J Gastroenterol. 2007 Jul 7;13(25):3405-8.

The psyche and the gut.

Author information

1
University Hospitals Tubingen, Department of Internal Medicine VI, Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, Osianderstrasse 5, Tubingen 72076, Germany. paul.enck@uni-tuebingen.de

Abstract

Research on gut-brain interactions has increased over the last decade and has brought about a number of new topics beyond "classical" subjects, such as "stress" and "personality", which have dominated the psychosomatic literature on gastrointestinal disorders over the past century. These novel topics include brain imaging of intestinal functions, placebo responses in gastroenterology, learning of gastrointestinal symptoms, quality of life in patients with intestinal complaints, and psychotherapy and familial aggregation of functional intestinal disorders. Currently, these new topics appear with a frequency of 1% to 3% in leading gastroenterological journals, either as data presentation or review papers. Increasing focus underlines the importance of enhancing our understanding on how the psyche and the brain communicate in order to better meet the needs of our patients.

PMID:
17659685
PMCID:
PMC4146774
DOI:
10.3748/wjg.v13.i25.3405
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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