Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Adolesc Health. 2007 Aug;41(2):126-31.

Relationship of adolescent gynecomastia with varicocele and somatometric parameters: a cross-sectional study in 6200 healthy boys.

Author information

1
Clinical Center for Endocrinology, Medical University, Sofia, Bulgaria.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To evaluate the relationship of gynecomastia with varicocele and somatometric parameters in otherwise clinically healthy boys.

METHODS:

The relationship between gynecomastia and somatometric parameters was examined with 6200 clinically healthy boys aged 0-19 years of different socioeconomic backgrounds in various schools, kindergartens, and childcare centers. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to model the prevalence of gynecomastia (>or=1cm) in relation to height, weight, testicular volume, penile length and circumference, age, pubic hair Tanner stage, and residential status.

RESULTS:

Pubic hair Tanner stages 3 and 4 had the highest incidence of gynecomastia. Gynecomastia was found only in boys more than 10 years old and its prevalence in the age group of 10-19 years (n = 3082) was 3.93 %. In boys 10-13 years old, gynecomastia was positively correlated with varicocele, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) was 2.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1-4.1). For the age at which gynecomastia was most prevalent (group aged 12-14 years), the adjusted OR of gynecomastia occurring in boys with varicocele, using the Cochran-Mantel-Hasenzel method of adjusting for age was 1.9 (95% CI = 1.1-3.4). Gynecomastia was negatively correlated with body mass index (BMI). In addition, it was weakly correlated with testicular volume, positively in age group 10-13 years and negatively in those 14-19 years. However no relationship was found between gynecomastia and penis size, urban/rural status, and sea level of residence.

CONCLUSIONS:

Adolescent gynecomastia is a mid-puberty event. It is significantly associated with varicocele and somatometric parameters including BMI and testicular volume.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center