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Climacteric. 2007 Aug;10(4):320-34.

A prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study on the influence of a hormone replacement therapy on skin aging in postmenopausal women.

Author information

1
Division of Special and Environmental Dermatology, Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, General Hospital, Vienna, Austria.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is mounting evidence that menopause affects some functions of the skin. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) appears to limit some of the climacteric aspects of cutaneous aging.

OBJECTIVE:

In the light of a growing interest in the endocrinological influence of skin, we performed a study evaluating the effects of HRT on skin aging in postmenopausal women.

METHODS:

Forty non-hysterectomized, postmenopausal women were included in this prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study on the influence of oral sequential treatment with a combination of 2 mg 17beta-estradiol/10 mg dydrogesterone (Femoston) for seven 28-day cycles. Skin elasticity, skin surface lipids, skin hydration and skin thickness were measured by non-invasive methods, and both adverse-event profile and clinical-dermatological status were evaluated.

RESULTS:

After 7 months of HRT, skin elasticity increased significantly at the right ramus of the mandible, while skin hydration tended to improve significantly at the right upper arm (inner side); skin thickness improved significantly but skin surface lipids did not. Absolute effects did not differ significantly between HRT and placebo patients. A dermatological evaluation was largely consistent with measurement results. Safety and tolerability of HRT were positive.

CONCLUSION:

The results showed improvements in the parameters involved in skin aging in the HRT group as compared to baseline. While skin aging is no indication for systemic hormone supplementation, a positive effect on aging skin can be observed.

PMID:
17653959
DOI:
10.1080/13697130701444073
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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