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Acta Oncol. 2007;46(6):723-34.

Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy with radiolabelled somatostatin analogues in patients with somatostatin receptor positive tumours.

Author information

1
Department of Nuclear Medicine, Erasmus MC, 's Gravendijkwal 230, Rotterdam, CE, the Netherlands. m.vanessen@erasmusmc.nl

Abstract

Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRT) with radiolabelled somatostatin analogues is a promising treatment option for patients with inoperable or metastasised neuroendocrine tumours. Symptomatic improvement may occur with all of the various (111)In, (90)Y, or (177)Lu-labelled somatostatin analogues that have been used. Since tumour size reduction was seldom achieved with (111)Indium labelled somatostatin analogues, radiolabelled somatostatin analogues with beta-emitting isotopes like (90)Y and (177)Lu were developed. Reported anti-tumour effects of [(90)Y-DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]octreotide vary considerably between various studies: Tumour regression of 50% or more was achieved in 9 to 33% (mean 22%). With [(177)Lu-DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]octreotate treatments, tumour regression of 50% or more was achieved in 28% of patients and tumour regression of 25 to 50% in 19% of patients, stable disease was demonstrated in 35% and progressive disease in 18%. Predictive factors for tumour remission were high tumour uptake on somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and limited amount of liver metastases. The side-effects of PRRT are few and mostly mild, certainly when using renal protective agents: Serious side-effects like myelodysplastic syndrome or renal failure are rare. The median duration of the therapy response for [(90)Y-DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]octreotide and [(177)Lu-DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]octreotate is 30 months and more than 36 months respectively. Lastly, quality of life improves significantly after treatment with [(177)Lu-DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]octreotate. These data compare favourably with the limited number of alternative treatment approaches, like chemotherapy. If more widespread use of PRRT is possible, such therapy might become the therapy of first choice in patients with metastasised or inoperable gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. Also the role in somatostatin receptor expressing non-GEP tumours, like metastasised paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma and non-radioiodine-avid differentiated thyroid carcinoma might become more important.

PMID:
17653893
DOI:
10.1080/02841860701441848
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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