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J Med Food. 2007 Jun;10(2):252-7.

Micellarization and intestinal cell uptake of beta-carotene and lutein from drumstick (Moringa oleifera) leaves.

Author information

1
Department of Biophysics, National Institute of Nutrition, Hyderabad, India.

Abstract

The leaves and pods of the drumstick tree are used as food and medicine in some Asian and African countries. Although relatively high concentrations of beta-carotene and lutein have been reported in the leaves, the bioavailability of these carotenoids from this source is unknown. We have analyzed the digestive stability and bioaccessibility of carotenoids in fresh and lyophilized drumstick leaves using the coupled in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model. Beta-carotene and lutein were stable during simulated gastric and small intestinal digestion. The efficiency of micellarization of lutein during the small intestinal phase of digestion exceeded that of beta-carotene. Addition of peanut oil (5% vol/wt) to the test food increased micellarization of both carotenoids, and particularly beta-carotene. Caco-2 cells accumulated beta-carotene and lutein from micelles generated during digestion of drumstick leaves in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The relatively high bioaccessibility of beta-carotene and lutein from drumstick leaves ingested with oil supports the potential use of this plant food for improving vitamin A nutrition and perhaps delaying the onset of some degenerative diseases such as cataracts.

PMID:
17651060
DOI:
10.1089/jmf.2006.250
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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