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Neurourol Urodyn. 2007;26(7):1030-5.

Does urethral competence affect urodynamic voiding parameters in women with prolapse?

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Utah College of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT 84132, USA. Ingrid.nygaard@hsc.utah.edu

Abstract

AIMS:

To (1) compare voiding parameters and (2) correlate symptoms and urodynamic findings in women with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and varying degrees of urethral competence.

METHODS:

We compared three groups of women with stages II-IV POP. Groups 1 and 2 were symptomatically stress continent women participating in the Colpopexy and Urinary Reduction Efforts (CARE) trial; during prolapse reduction before sacrocolpopexy, Group 1 (n = 67) did not have and Group 2 (n = 84) had urodynamic stress incontinence (USI) during prolapse reduction. Group 3 participants (n = 74), recruited specifically for this study, had stress urinary incontinence (SUI) symptoms and planned sacrocolpopexy. Participants completed standardized uroflowmetry, pressure voiding studies, and validated symptom questionnaires.

RESULTS:

Subjects' median age was 61 years, median parity 3 and 87% had stage III or IV POP. Fourteen percent of women in Group 3 demonstrated USI without, and 70% with, prolapse reduction. Women in Groups 2 and 3 had more detrusor overactivity (DO) than Group 1 (17 and 24% vs. 6%, P = 0.02) and detrusor overactivity incontinence (DOI) (15 and 8% vs. 0%, P = 0.004). Based on the Blaivis-Groutz nomogram, 60% of all women were obstructed. Post-void residual volume (PVR), peak flow rate, detrusor pressure at peak flow, voiding mechanisms, voiding patterns, obstruction and urinary retention did not differ among groups. Women in Group 3 had higher irritative and obstructive symptom scores than Group 1 or 2; neither score differed by presence of DO nor obstruction, respectively.

CONCLUSION:

Women with POP have significant rates of urodynamic obstruction and retention, independent of their continence status. Symptoms of obstruction and retention correlate poorly with urodynamic findings.

PMID:
17638306
DOI:
10.1002/nau.20436
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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