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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Jul;15(7):1702-9.

Cognitive behavioral therapy and fluoxetine for binge eating disorder: two-year follow-up.

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1
Eating Disorders Research Unit, New York State Psychiatric Institute, and College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, Unit 116, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032, USA. mjd5@columbia.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study assessed the long-term effects of group behavioral treatment plus individual cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and/or fluoxetine in binge eating disorder (BED) patients.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES:

A total of 116 individuals were randomized to an initial five-month trial and were followed up over two years. Assessments, including binge frequency, weight, and self-report measures, were administered at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and approximately 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after initial treatment.

RESULTS:

Across treatment groups, there was overall improvement over 29 months in binge frequency and in binge abstinence. The odds of binge abstinence 2 years post-treatment were 1.373 times the odds of binge abstinence immediately post-treatment. There was no significant change in weight over the two-year period. Subjects who received individual CBT evidenced lower binge frequency over the two-year follow-up period than patients who had not received individual CBT. Similarly, CBT was associated with increased rates of binge abstinence. There were no main effects of treatment assignment on weight over the two-year follow-up period. There was a significant advantage for fluoxetine assignment over the two-year follow-up period on depressive symptoms.

DISCUSSION:

The major significance of the study rests in its examination of the long-term effects of standardized interventions for BED. Our findings provide support for the ideas that short-term treatment may confer long-term benefit and that not all treatments are equivalent in the benefits they confer.

PMID:
17636088
DOI:
10.1038/oby.2007.203
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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